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PyroNova Technical Data Sheet

PyroNova is a 100 percent active, non-phosphate, flame retardant powder designed to be added to the rinse cycle to flame retard cotton uniforms. The product is considered non-toxic and non-hazardous and generally not skin sensitive. The product dissolved in water is mildly alkaline.

Properties

Color: White powder
Bulk density: 7.7 pounds per gallon
pH: 8.0 ± 0.1 (15% solution in water)
Odor: none

Application

PyroNova may be added directly to the warm final rinse water to a concentration between 10 to 15 percent by weight (80 to 125 pounds/100 gallons of water). The hotter the rinse water the faster the PyroNova dissolves. PyroNova will completely dissolve in 120° F water in 2 to 3 minutes. A 5-minute rinse cycle is recommended before the excess solution is centrifuged from the uniforms.

The rinse water may be saved for reuse. If the rinse water is reused, it will be necessary to keep the temperature above 90° F to prevent the flame retardant from crystallizing out of solution. Also you will need to bring the liquid volume up to the starting level by adding more water and PyroNova to make up for the amount used. If the rinse water containing the flame retardant is not to be reused, it may be disposed of using the standard method of disposal used in the laundry. No unusual waste disposal methods are required.

Cotton fabric may be effectively flame retarded to meet NFPA 701 burn test standards by the addition of between 10 to 15 percent PyroNova on a dry-weight basis. The amount of PyroNova required will depend on the weave density of the fabric and the rate of penetration into the cotton. Excellent results have been achieved as low as 10 percent addition. It is always recommended to test a small sample of the fabric first before going to a full scale test. Although PyroNova will not affect most fabric colors, it is always important to check first.

CAUTION PyroNova does not give permanent flame retardancy to the fabric. Washing of the fabric will require reapplication.



Page Last Edited: Tuesday, October 6, 2015

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